Please don’t call me a thought leader

Please don’t call me a thought leader

There are certain words and phrases I find myself using every day that I wish I didn’t have to. ‘Thought leadership’ is one. ‘Community’ is another. Even ‘social media’ sticks in my throat it has become so overladen with misinterpretation, expectation and confusion.

But anyway…

But anyway…

ABC blocksI wonder if any of you have a memory like this? I must have been about two or three years old. Either way, my brother, who is fifteen months younger than me, was still in a high chair. I remember that we were on holiday and staying in a holiday apartment or hotel (I’m not sure which). My brother was being fed a boiled egg in his high chair and Dad was talking to Mum.

Capital punishment: why using random capitals is a crime!

Capital punishment: why using random capitals is a crime!

capital lettersAgh – few things annoy my linguistic sensibilities more than random capitalisation. Sure, misplaced apostrophes are probably a greater grammatical blot on the language landscape, but the capitalisation of words is more irritating because of its intentional nature. I’m currently editing and rewriting the copy on a massive IT website and still come across examples of nail-on-blackboard level irritation.

Can you read this post?

Can you read this post?

How easy is this blog to read? Apparently, yesterday’s blog post A lick of paint is comfortable reading for 13 year old students – or grade 7. The prevous post, Don’t blame marketing for a sexist society, is seemingly much harder for some readers, requiring a year 12 or college level education to decipher. How do I know this? A little-known tool hidden within Microsoft Word that assesses readability according to the Flesch-Kincaid Readability Test (Wikipedia).

Resisting Extravagant Verbosity

Resisting Extravagant Verbosity

Should wordsmiths imbue compositions with dexterous and verbose adroitness? Or should writers use short, simple phrases? I often come against amateur writers, particular in business, who insist writing should be a demonstration of language skill.